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Women in Horror Month Begins

The last few years I’ve featured female writers and did a set of interview questions for February’s Women in Horror Month. Last year I focused on poets. But this year, well, we have everyone living in horror and my juices have been sucked dry. This horror is more a slow building of dread and fear in the Lovecraftian sense as we live through the unending pandemic, the small blips of hope, the plummets of despair and fear, the isolation and feelings of insignificance and dread. Sound familiar?

If there is one good thing to be said of a global pandemic, it’s that everyone can understand what people are feeling no matter where in the world they live. We’ve been holding our breaths so long, hoping this will end, that we’re passing out from it and waking with brain damage and to discover that the living horror has not ended. We’re still in it. There is no place to escape to. Who needs invading aliens when the alien virus is among us? There is no massive conflict for space but inner conflicts of people enduring in silence.

Many people are living in prisons called care homes, or even their own homes. We all wear masks into banks, at airports, in stores, when just 2 years ago you would be arrested for doing so. When and if this virus is under control with a vaccine and if it just doesn’t spawn a new variant, the repercussions on global economy, mental and physical health will be seen for a long time to come.

S&T 137

Now, if that isn’t a horror we can relate to, I don’t know what is. Some writers have probably been hit with crippling malaise (as has the world) while others struggle on. I know that in an isolation I’m not handling so well, and coupled with grief of losing 2 family members 2 consecutive years before covid, and with feelings that I’ve become a ghost and a criminal, I have turned to writing to handle the gaping, hungry maw of loneliness. Is it any surprise I’m writing poems about becoming invisible, and about apocalypses? “Divinity in the Afterglow” was published last year in Space and Time and was probably one of my first pandemic apocalypse pieces. We are after all, informed by the world in which we live, even if we imagine other times.

The image for this year’s Women in Horror Month says it all. The hottest fashion item of 2020 was a mask. Everyone has one, young or old. We might have many. I should be talking about my writing here, as a woman in horror, and to feature our works. I should have done it months ago. I should have post this on Feb. 1, but the creeping malaise takes its toll. We’re experiencing covid fatigue with feelings of despair, sadness, confusion and anger. This SF horror movie isn’t ending and who knew that the greatest antagonist would be boredom?

I will be featuring a few women through this month, so check back. I might even post more about what I’ve been doing. If I can say one thing about writing; it’s been my outlet as I try to hold onto sanity and funnel my emotions into something creative. Welcome to Women in Horror Month.

And here are a few publications that have come out in Dec. and Jan. and in which I have some pieces. “The Metallurgist’s Dream” in HWA Poetry Showcase VII, “Telltale Moon,” nominated for a Pushcart Prize in Dreams and Nightmares 116, “Dragon’s Hoard” in The Fifth Dimension, “Offering” and “In Feline Grace” in Illumen, and the phobic story “Mousetrap” in The Pulp Horror Book of Phobias II.

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February 5, 2021 · 12:38 am

Tesseracts 17 Interview: Willie Meikle

anthology, speculative fiction, SF, fantasy, Canadian authors

Tesseracts 17 is now out with tales from Canadian writers that span all times and places.

William Meikle hails from Scotland and Newfoundland, and brings us a tale of deep space mystery with “In the Bubble.” http://www.williammeikle.com

CA: “In the Bubble” is hard core SF, in space with a mysterious murder. Do you think when we do head for the stars that humanity will come together against a common unknown (space) or do you think humankind’s baser emotions will still play out their dramas?

I’m a pessimist when it comes to humanity. We’re just too stupid to see beyond immediate gain and look at the big picture—we are already way too far down the line to disaster, and I can’t see us getting anywhere close to the stars. We’ll kill ourselves off first, over  food and water rights on a dying planet. There’s a cheery thought to start a new year.

CA: Do you think science will one day take us to being able to read another person’s thoughts? Do you think it will make communication better or worse if this could happen?

I think something close will be possible— some kind of emotion reader should be doable very soon, and people are already working on turning dreams into screen images. I doubt it will improve communication. It will make misunderstandings less common, sure. But it will also mean people would know exactly what you think of them. I foresee a lot more punch-ups.

CA:  Would you ever want to literally get inside someone’s head to think, see or feel as they do?

mysteries, thrillers, SF, speculative writing, Canadina authors, Scottish writers,

William Meikle writes mysteries that take place in space and in Glasgow.

Nope. Not even remotely. I have enough trouble inside my own head as it is. I think part of what makes us human is trying to figure out what other people are thinking. If we ever actually find out, the mystery is gone. Then what is left?

CA: Since your story is also a crime thriller in space, do you write other mysteries, and do you enjoy reading them?

CA: I do indeed enjoy reading them—I grew up on a diet of Ed McBain, Raymond Chandler and Agatha Christie amid all the genre work I was reading.  Quite a lot of that has seeped into my own writing, in particular into my Midnight Eye series. Derek Adams is a Glasgow PI,  usually down to his last cigarette and bottle of scotch, wearily fighting his way though the Glasgow underworld and the supernatural elements that keep leaping at him despite his best efforts to avoid it. I’ve also attempted a cozy murder mystery, and have a collection published of weird Sherlock Holmes stories. I suspect there’s more to come.

CA: What other projects do you have in the works?

I’m busy. I’m in the middle of a six book contract with DARKFUSE for horror works, I have a Professor Challenger collection coming this year from DARK RENAISSANCE among other things, and I’m currently coming to the end of the writing of three Sherlock Holmes novellas.  After that I have a ghost story collection I want to write, and a space opera novel that’s been gestating for a while, so I’m going to be busy for years to come yet.

William Meikle is a Scottish writer, now living in Canada, with twenty novels published in the genre press and over 300 short story credits in thirteen countries. His work has appeared in a number of professional anthologies and magazines with recent sales to NATURE Futures, Penumbra and Buzzy Mag among others. He lives in Newfoundland with whales, bald eagles and icebergs for company. When he’s not writing he plays guitar, drinks beer and dreams of fortune and glory.

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January 15, 2014 · 8:41 pm