Tag Archives: Norway

The Cornucopia List: June 18

I think I missed my list last week of five things for which I’m grateful. I hit a really busy period so I’ll just list five things for the last two weeks.

  1. Pastoral Foothills–I drove to Osoyoos last weekend, a very dry part of BC, and even drier in Oliver where the large mudslide happened. BC is mostly the Rocky Mountain range from the coast to the border so much of our towns and cities are situated near mountains or in rolling hills. Osoyoos and area is rolling, humped hills, in shades of green with small copses of trees and a smattering of cows and horses. With the fluffy clouds overhead, interspersed with hot sun, it gave a dappled pattern to the earth. Truly beautiful.
  2. Happy People–Of course we’re not often grateful for the grumps but being around people last weekend just taking it easy, mingling, chatting and drinking made me realize I’d missed many of them.
  3. Illumination–I’m not talking about the light that shines from the sky or from electronic bulbs. I’m talking medieval manuscripts and the illuminated borders and capitals. The “illumination” in a scroll or manuscript was the laying down of gold leaf, which gave the piece  a certain brilliance especially in those tallow candle times. Those old pages, worked on painstakingly by monks for days and weeks on end can be truly astounding. I know people who do this and I have done such illuminations in the past though my skills pale next to what I can see some people do. In fact, some of them might have been seen as blessed by God in the good ole days. This illumination was taken from the Fitzwilliam Museum’s site: http://www.fitzmuseum.cam.ac.uk/
  4. Estate Wineries–I really want to do a wine tour through the Okanagan, but when I have enough money to actually buy some of the wines. We did stop at the Forbidden Fruit winery on the way back from Osoyoos as we didn’t have a lot of time. They had some ice wines (for $20 it’s much cheaper than you can get in the liquor store), a couple of ports, and one or two white and red wines. I bought a bottle of the Cabernet Sauvignon and the Plumiliscious ice wine (sort of an ice wine I think). They had about eight different types with cherry, apricot, apple, plum, white grape, peach etc. Maybe later this summer…
  5. Genealogy–It’s interesting and fascinating to see where our roots lead. My aunt, who passed away recently, had tracked one side of the family tree, the part I knew least about. I knew there was Danish and Italian in our family but I didn’t know about the Norwegian, a line that can be tracked back at least to the 1600s. My ancestors were part of Rovang Gaard, being the Rovang farm families. Good ole peasant stock, no special people except for everyone being special in their own way. I look at the branchings, all the surnames and all the people in those families and think about track the other three branches and how they  would branch and branch all the way back to the first awareness of self. It’s truly possible that we’re all related to half the world. When thinking about it this way it’s even more bizarre to think you could hate or be racist against part of your own family but then families don’t always get along, do they? Still, I’m fascinated by the names.
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The Rock of Cashel, Ireland

From  my fall 2007 trip to Ireland.
It’s a long way to Tipperary but if you go to Cashel, then you have in fact made it. Cashel (with the accent on the first syllable) was a lovely town (I’ve now officially lost track of the days). It’s small, a mix of medieval and modern and winds slowly up to the mound where the Rock of Cashel is. The castle was built at the highest point. It’s suffered some weather damage over the years from wind (parts blown down, such as the high cross and some crenellations) and rain. The castle is a sprawling place, containing several buildings, and cold. It was a windy enough day there but we could see from all sides, overlooking the town.
I didn’t do as well a job of editing these photos so there are a lot of pictures of fresco details and pillars.

The oldest part of Cashel is more than a thousand years old. We did the site tour , which had a very entertaining guy who gave great insights into the place’s very long history. Viewing over the cemetery, the distant hills show a dip. The tale goes that one day the devil was walking along, in a foul mood and took a big bite out of the hills. That dip is called the Devil’s Bite and when the devil spit out the chomp he took, it made the Rock of Cashel.
 
The oldest part was probably the tower as these are evident in all of the oldest monasteries (as lookouts for the Vikings). Then there was a smallish chapel, made I believe of limestone as that is the composition of the mount as well. The walls and ceiling had been painted in frescoes. Some of the design is still visible with red, blue, yellow and white colors. That was amazing to see, and religious figures and diapering designs were still discernible. This chapel was also unique in its crookedness. When looking through the arched entry it was obvious that it wasn’t in the center of that wall, nor was the arch geometrically even. I bet it was built by unskilled monks and laborers with no architect or only directions passed down the line from one guy to another.
 
There are the little sculpted heads there were also on the Dysert O’Dea doorway. The remains of a broken stone casket was inside. The front has and Urnes style beast on it, which helps date this part of Cashel to 900-1000 CE. Urnes style resembles the famous carved stave churches of Norway, indicating the influence of the time.
 
Ireland is working hard to preserve its heritage and history. Many of the castles are owned by county or country tourism. It’s a long and expensive process but there was evidence of work on Cashel, especially in spots that needed to preserve the building’s integrity.

Brian Boru, and his grandson were some of the early Munster kings that ruled from here. But his grandson gave the castle over to the Bishop of Limerick. This began the long ecclesiastical history of the castle. There was an enclosed museum, which had some religious artifacts, pennannular brooches, and stonework that had been moved in to preserve them.

Another chapel (I don’t know the actual religious names for these different buildings) was redone with a wooden roof (no nails) and plant made pigments painted on the gothic arches and angels that decorated the room. Most castles and churches had wooden roofs as the technique for making the corbelled (or other) stone roofs was complicated and put a lot of weight on the walls. Throughout these buildings there are many square holes in the walls. These are post holes, for floors and stairs. It makes one realize how drafty these stone places would have been.

The town itself was fairly small and we were hardpressed to find a place to eat that night, but ate at the Town Hall, a higher end and very good restaurant. It is so named because it is in the old town hall. We’d had a drink in one of local pub earlier and many of the pubs in this area of Ireland have little hearths and some that burn coal still. We spent several hours at Cashel and then moved on to Limerick.

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