Tag Archives: massage therapy

Cornucopia List: August 6

I realize this list is more a personal indulgence than perhaps a piece that others are interested in, but as they say: it’s my blog and I can write what I want to. So here goes my list of things for which I’m grateful.

  1. Massages–I wish I could get these more often, and I’m talking about therapeutic massages, but any are nice. I have a soft tissue condition (chronic myofascial pain) which causes my muscles to knot and not release. This causes hard, rocklike nodules that can refer pain to all other sorts of areas in the body. Hard trigger point massage is about the only way to release these (or a long vacation in a hot place) and it’s painful. Unfortunately our medical system likes to think that massage isn’t necessary and in the long run it costs our system more. So massages I appreciate with a deep and undying love.
  2. Dreams–These are the dreams of sleep, not of the waking hour. We spend a third of our lives sleeping (more or less) and in a way it seems a waste not to do something. Of course, our bodies replenish their stores so that we can function properly in our waking hours, but it doesn’t always seem enough. So I love remembering my dreams. They’re rarely mundane and run the gamut to strange adventures and even stranger lands. And yes, I have managed to write quite a few dreams into stories or poems.
  3. Faerieworlds–I’ll write a review of this event in the next day or two, but it was such a good time for just camping, hanging out, wandering about and listening to some awesome bands, that I’d do it again. Oh and the wings. What fun to dress up as fairies just because you can. There were some astounding outfits and spontaneous performance art by people attending. It gave me ideas!
  4. My Brain–Oh brain, where would I be without you? A brain is something not to waste, which means I don’t want to spend all my evenings being a couch potato. I want to explore, do new things, have varying adventures from socializing with friends, to reading, writing or hiking. The brain is complex and not always knowable even to ourselves. I hope it continues to work well and to expand in knowledge and memory.
  5. Randomness–What a humdrum place our world would be if it was completely regimented. Not all surprises are good and not all random things go well but to see or experience the unexpected, to not know what is around every corner, now that is what keeps us living and moving and adapting. I love random things. In fact I like randomness so much that I abhor schedules. Ah to live a very random life.

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Healthscare: the Undermining of Our Free Health

I’ve already said that if the government is so worried about the funding for our health care, then part of the solution is preventative medicine. This means you can’t deny people services when they’re in an acute stage. The longer one waits for treatment, the more it costs the health system as the problem becomes chronic, sometimes with life lasting problems.

At the same time, each provincial government seems to have the impunity to whittle away our health care any way they want, without the federal government saying anything. In BC, we used to get 12 covered visits for chiropractic, physiotherapy and massage therapy each. I suffer from soft tissue problems which often take the combination of massage and chiropractic to stop my bones from being pulled out of alignment by my over-tight muscles. The BC government somehow didn’t believe that these therapies helped people so they took them away. Then you were allowed ten visits total and only if on subsidized medical.

Subsidized? But surely health care is free in Canada. Well, some provinces are freer than others. Alberta and BC pay a monthly premium (in which you are harassed, ignored and strong-armed into these payments–to be elucidated on later). BC residents pay $54 a month. Oh, and let’s see what we lost when the Liberal (liberal?!!) government decided to bleed us, but not for our health.

  1. Premiums doubled (we’ve always had to pay)
  2. Massage, physio and chiro went to no free visits (or only 10 combined if you were subsidized)
  3. Podiatrists were dropped (what happens to people’s feet as they get older)
  4. Optometrists were dropped (what happens to eyes as people get older)

Optometrists seem to be covered if you have a health problem but a check-up is not. Glasses and/or contacts have never been covered. Likewise, somehow dental health has never been covered. As someone who has no medical/dental plan, the cost of even the basic dental health is out of reach for many people. I’ll be paying out over $2000 for one crown and one root canal. Feet problems? Well I may have to put those off. Back problems. I suffer longer, use more painkillers which do not work and worry about the problems that become worse with time, where I must visit the doctor more often, get more prescriptions and seek more specialists.

Over the years of the mismanagement of MSP (Medical Services Plan) I have written letters and asked why we pay when other provinces do not. To this day I have never received any communication from MSP except for the automaton bills, which are erratic at best. I’ll devote a piece just to the unfair billing practises of MSP.

And now we’re looking at bill c-51 about to be passed where you and I will not be able to buy vitamin C, echinacea or anything else we want over the counter. We’ll need prescriptions and that will cost more. My last prescription: the drug was $6.50, the dispensing fee was $8.30. What will this mean? Pharmaceutical companies and drugstores will get richer, we’ll put greater strain on the health care system by either having to see our doctor for a prescription or by ignoring and taking no vitamins.

Granted there is a lot of self-medication and taking supplements that don’t do anything but really, will I need a doctor’s permission to take vitamin C and iron. Write your member of parliament if you’re concerned about any of this.

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Filed under Culture, health care, politics, Writing