Tag Archives: ebooks

Writing Update: The Collection Progresses

I have actually been too busy to write here but I thought I’d toss in an update on what’s been transpiring.

Deadline for voting in the Aurora Awards closes on Monday, July 23 so if you’re Canadian and would like to vote you can go here. There is also a voters package that contains the works being nominated. Since you pay $10 to vote (unless you already paid to nominate), then you can consider it a purchase of several novels, short, stories, art works and poems. My poem “A Good Catch” is nominated in the poetry category and the awards will be given in Calgary at the When Words Collide convention, which I will be at.

I have a week left to finish my story for Masked Mosaic. It’s been a bit of a struggle so I’m not sure how successful I’ll be. But mostly my time has been taken with formatting and getting my collection of stories ready for putting on Smashwords, for ereaders and then for print. If you’re interested in a print copy, send me a message and I’ll let you know when it’s ready and the cost.

The collection will be called “Embers Amongst the Fallen” and will include sixteen stories, two of them new. Wayne Allen Sallee has written a lovely blurb:

“Anderson is an enigma. Many of her stories evoke the tense subtleties of Shirley Jackson, but then I go on to another story and it breathes of Richard Matheson or the late Ray Bradbury. Few people can pull off the whipsaw of terror to wonder and back, but Colleen makes it way past easy.”

Wayne is a “5 time finalist-Stoker Award-First Novel, Collection, Novella, Novelette, Short Story.” East Coast, dark fiction writer Steve Vernon is writing an introduction for the collection as well so I feel very honored that these people, along with Sandra Kasturi of CZP who proofread it, have agreed to be part of it.

Polu Texni has bought another poem, “Mermaid,” which is written in the style of a villanelle. I’m not sure when it will be up on the site. Now, on to the process of self-producing a book.

books, publishing, collection, reprints, ebooks, Smashwords, writing, book production

Creative Commons: Ninha Morandini

Smashwords is for ereaders and once you have your book formatted they will make it readable for different readers and send out a catalog. You have to meet their formatting guidelines and produce a cover. I have a friend working on one right now. There is a giant book that can be downloaded for free that is the Smashwords style guide. Interestingly enough, it has formatting issues in rtf, but is okay in PDF. It’s written for those who are not even that familiar with using Word. I’m pretty much an expert (though the stupid Office/Word 2007 sucks big time and annoys the hell out of me) so I’m finding the book a bit tedious in some sections. I have to glean through though because some information is buried and some not so clear.

I have got rid of most of the marks and spaces that they require but I also have one story with footnotes and I still have to determine how to make sure those show correctly. I’m presuming once I get to the submission part that I’ll get to review before it goes to the vetters (they send it back if  there are formatting errors). It’s that part that could slow down my release date of Aug. 1.  I’m more than half way through the formatting and just waiting for the intro (and to complete my acknowledgements) so I hope by this weekend I’ll only be dealing with getting the cover art finalized.

It’s been an interesting process and I’ve been working on a few erotic stories to put up as well. Formatting one story is much easier than the book but I’m learning some things when doing this. Stay tuned for the release of my first collection.


		
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Editing: A Job Interview

This happened some time last year when a job for editing showed up on one of editors’ lists I am on: a publisher looking for freelance content editors. I sent my resume in and got a forwarded email that said sign into an instant messaging group to discuss this. Now this was for book editing and that’s my specialty, been doing it for 15 years. So the managing editor asks if I use story arcs and I ask her to define what she means in terms of editing as people use this term differently. Basically, she means plot, conflict, resolution and flow. Etc. The usual. She says editing is usually between 25-50 hours a manuscript, which is fine; nothing unusual.Then I ask what they pay and she says 10%. O-kay. So I said, could you please break this down for me as I’m not sure what 10% is from and I’ve always worked hourly contracts before. (I mean it could be 10% of cover price and books printed, or sold, or 10% of wholesale.) I don’t know. It’s a simple question.

She then goes on to say that line editing is a waste of time and that if a writer can’t write, then they (the publisher) don’t want the book. I said, I understand, however when I did copy editing it was never for the same repetitive mistakes but sometimes to correct grammar, odd typos, and check for consistency (continuity). After all, we all miss things in our own writing from seeing it too often, and copy editors give a fresh eye to the grammar.

Then she says, “We love our proofreaders. We don’t need proofreaders.” She says this a couple of times, adding they have no work for hire. So I say, I’m sorry, I thought you were looking for content editors.

Through all this she has not yet given me that breakdown of 10% but basically, from what I can tell, the editor gets paid if the book sells. It could be $5 for all I know. I have already said, yes but I’ve worked hourly before so I don’t know how this breaks down. She says, “Hon, I’m not disputing (but she is) and I’ve worked for 5 publishing houses in 7 years.” I didn’t bother to get into the one-upmanship and say I’ve worked for as many if not more in 15 years. Hon? From someone I don’t know? That’s pretty condescending. It’s like she hasn’t read my resume, nor heard what I was saying and was on a personal crusade.

At this point I’m getting angry as she seems to presume I’m talking about proofreading. I’ve already talked about content and have said I’ve done proofreading, copyediting, line as well as structural and stylistic editing. I know the difference. I’m not sure she does. Then she blathers that she’s had 200 responses and needs to make sure she has a content editor (after once saying she had 3000 manuscripts and rejected them all).

I haven’t met this person in person but I’m already getting a sense that her pile is bigger than everyone else’s. And working for her would be a personality conflict waiting to happen. At that point I say, I think I’ll pass on this as I’d like to know I’ll be paid a base rate for what I do. MFG! Does this woman think all publishing is based out of her ebusiness? (Turns out she’s the CEO too.)

Fine, name as many publishing houses as you want, but don’t discount there is more than one way to do things and pay people. She seemed to believe her way of paying was the only way, and indeed it may be for ebooks, but it’s not for other publishers. Having worked for US and Canadian publishers, I know. I have invoices. I’ve been paid an hourly fee on all of them. In a few cases when I freelance I might have charged by the project but usually I charged by the hour.

I think I avoided a very uncomfortable and possibly not lucrative job editing books for peanuts.

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